Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence (EI) has been a mainstream topic for more than two decades thanks to the work of Daniel Goleman and his book Emotional Intelligence. The book focuses on the role that emotions play in thought, decision making, and individual success, and that this role is much greater than most people realise. In fact, research has found that there is a positive link between EI and psychological wellbeing. [1] Specifically, self‐esteem, life satisfaction, and self‐acceptance are greatest in individuals who have high levels of EI. Traditionally work was a place where employees were expected to ‘leave emotions at the door’. However, several of Goleman’s subsequent books and research have focused on EI and its role in business and have revealed direct links between emotional intelligence and business results. When someone has a high level of EI, they have the ability to perceive, control, and evaluate emotions in themselves and others. People with high EI are skilled at understanding and relating to others and these skills have a significant impact on not only workplace relationships but also performance. EI is even considered to have a greater impact on job performance than traditional measures of intelligence, including IQ. A lot of skills critical…